Showing posts with label K-8. Show all posts
Showing posts with label K-8. Show all posts

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Scratch 2.0

I'm so excited...

but keep seeing this screen! I've been checking like every 1/2 hour or so! Have a web-based version will be a HUGE benefit to teachers everywhere! No more fighting with the IT guys and downloading the program onto the server!

Stay tuned to the blog as I continually update with more K-8 Coding challenges aligned to the CCSS in math!

Saturday, March 30, 2013

ISTE 2013 - Augmented Reality Game Post #2

Trying to figure out the waypoints...landmarks!

Got up early this morning to head to the Convention Center. There is a rather large parking structure that cost $11 for the day...right across the street from the center. Just an FYI - we parked at about 8am and the lot was full by 9:30.

Went in search of photos and learning the "lay of the land..." In order to create the Aris game for everyone, I will be dividing the game into QUESTS that teams can participate in.

I thought Henry B. Gonzalez should be a part of one of the QUESTS, as the convention center is named after him. I took a pic and then used iPhoto to make it black and white and "older..." Thought this might bring authenticity to the video clip I am planning on bringing into the game.

Lots of walking around to find the Map points and the images I would need. I then headed back to the convention center to play around with ARIS. Finding the convention center on the map was not too difficult; however, figuring out if I needed a character, plaque, or an object was a bit tricky.

Luckily my husband was a good sport, because I would create some of the programming pieces and then send him out to test and see if it showed up on his ARIS app. We spent a total of six hours gathering our resources and testing and trying the various ARIS programming options.

Headed back to hotel and will pick up again tomorrow!

Sunday, March 3, 2013

What Most Schools Don't Teach... do we take the intimidation of coding (computer programming) out of the equation? "In the next ten years, there will be about 1.4 million jobs in computer science and only 400,000 qualified graduates to fill those jobs."

Please see the following video that stresses the importance of computational thinking and learning how to code (program). If you attended my classroom 2.0 live webinar yesterday, this video is a more detailed version of the one we previewed at the beginning before the session started. It REALLY is a powerful message and includes Bill Gates and a quote from Steve Jobs.

Stay tuned for my first instructional video geared toward my vision of K-8 computational thinking (programming) for all! I will be posting a video for the "newbies" that uses only three of the programming blocks and is easy enough for even the K-2'ers!

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Magnetism & Electricity Video Game

Video games can bring engagement through mastery of content. Bailey, a fourth grader who scored above an 80% on her pre-test for an up-coming unit on electricity and magnetism, decided to create a video game review for her classmates to use in preparation for their unit test.

Not only did Bailey increase her computational thinking skills, but she also scored a 100% on the post-test, as she had to know the content forward and backwards in order to create her game. Her classmates also found success in studying for their unit test, but evaluating and providing feedback to Bailey on the game she created.

When all was said and done, over 90% of the students received grades of 90% and above on their unit final. The lowest score was a 73%! Take a look at an up-close and personal interview with Bailey, as she shares her project and insights with you!

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Welcome to K-8 educational programming!

I've finally decided to split my blog so that I could focus on providing resources, ideas and materials for those interested in K-8 computer programming. I keep hearing that we are not generating any interest in this topic, however...I am hoping that there are more of you out there that are attempting to incorporate the skills of computational thinking and programming into your core curriculum.
I have just finished creating a template for teachers to use in creating a realistic Family Feud type of game that will allow their students to play on the web. For those of you familiar with Scratch, this should be pretty easy.

For those "newbies," I have created a document that provides you will step-by-step directions on which seven programming blocks you need to change to create your own questions and answers. Click on the game and feel free to download and use in your own classroom!

If you would like the directions, you can find them here:

My goal is to post at least two/three new resources each week. Also...check out the K-8 programming playground at:
Feel free to follow along on my journey! Your STRETCh Instructor -